Oldtown: Feedback and Suggestions

Our aim is to not only build the best version of these projects that we are capable of, but also one that is as inclusive as possible and that ideally manages to integrate as many ideas as possible. This balance is delicate, and the more people show interest in a project, the more difficult it becomes to keep it.

...we don't just want to copy it in, and we want as many people as possible to be able to recognize themselves and their creativity in the finished build as possible.

Hear hear! A challenge indeed. I implore people to remain open minded about what the finished product will look like, it will make organizing the build a much smoother and more enjoyable process. I've always found in leading a project (irl as well) that listening to your team and giving them a high degree of creative input, instead of forcing your "vision" onto everyone, almost always results in a more rewarding experience and better result.
 
As with all major server builds, the leader(s) will be appointed by a mod consensus. That is because while we have a great many people perfectly capable of building us a decent Starry Sept, leading a server build comes with an entirely different set of skills required of the leader(s) - at least speaking from my personal experience with leading and participating in server builds since 2012.

Our most prestigious projects usually have a huge number of stakeholders - everyone has their own vision for a famous place like Winterfell or the Red Keep, or the Starry Sept, Citadel and the Hightower in Oldtown. Our aim is to not only build the best version of these projects that we are capable of, but also one that is as inclusive as possible and that ideally manages to integrate as many ideas as possible. This balance is delicate, and the more people show interest in a project, the more difficult it becomes to keep it. This is why we usually very carefully decide on who is to lead such a project - and the criteria that we look for in that person(s) focus more on leadership, communication, authority, fairness and more rather than actual building skills.

We all know there is probably a great number of builders we could simply task to build the thing for us and it would turn out nicely. But as I said, we don't just want to copy it in, and we want as many people as possible to be able to recognize themselves and their creativity in the finished build as possible.

This is why there will not be the possibility to apply for the general leadership of a project like the Starry Sept, the Hightower or the Citadel in Oldtown, but there will be opportunities within those projects:
Like we did in Winterfell or the Red Keep, the projects will be divided into smaller parts and people will be able to lead small teams focusing on those, within the constraints set by the overall leadership. For instance, in Winterfell people were able to lead e.g. the library tower or the great hall, and others were able to contribute to those, while the general layouts, styles and palettes were defined by Thamus. We will do something similar with the three big server projects in Oldtown.
Fin didn't apply for anything, he just built tests, like others did, too. We decided to take one as the base for the server build. We likely do something like this with the other two server builds.

So to clarify, the main monuments like the Starry Sept and Hightower proper will be chosen by the leads but surrounding builds of lesser importance will have their own sub leaders in the same way that Winterfell’s Library tower did?
 

Iwan

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So to clarify, the main monuments like the Starry Sept and Hightower proper will be chosen by the leads but surrounding builds of lesser importance will have their own sub leaders in the same way that Winterfell’s Library tower did?
Not surrounding builds, but small parts of the same project. The library tower is still a part of the Winterfell project, but was a sort of sub-project to the overarching Winterfell project. Ark and Dragons lead the entire Battle Isle project, the Hightower is the most significant part of it. We might chop it up into smaller pieces and let people have a go at different parts of it (not decided yet in detail). The secondary buildings you find on the Battle Isle will in most cases be up for application and small teams to work on. Same with the Citadel and the Starry Sept.
 
Could be interesting to have a section of the city that has a prominent amount of towers
slowly takes out presentation to raise the mood back

Some may remember that some time ago the possibility of incorporating towers like the ones on Bologna or San Gimignano was mentioned. I really like the idea, and it could be used as a way to add character to certains neighborhoods and districs of the city. There were 2 main explanations exposed as to why noblemen of Oldtown would build these structures: protection and prestige. Both are completely valid, but I would like to add a third one that would make them usefull rigth now: watchtowers.

The biggest merchants and traders, those whose bussines depend heavily on long-distance trade, would erect towers on top of their palaces and estates in order to use them as look-out post for patrolling the arrival and departure of their ships and fleets. These use is directly inspired on the torres-mirador de Cádiz.

Cádiz is a coastal city situated on the southwest of Spain. Located on and island off the mainland (now a peninsula), Cádiz was always a major port, since it was founded by the phoenicians almost 3000 years ago. Moving to the 1500's, when America was colonized, Castille managed the goods that came form the New World by giving just one city the privilege (the monopoly) of trading with the territories overseas. This role was played by Sevilla up until 1717, when the port at the Guadalquivir (the river that runs througth Sevilla) became clogged with silt, and Cadiz was given the monopoly. During almost a century Cádiz was the only city where trade with America was possible. Just like Sevilla before, this lead to the establishment of many merchats and bourgeois in the city. Now is when this newly created merchant class builds this towers as a way of controling their source of income.

Sooner than later to the practical use of this structures was added the prestigious aura that having a tower gave to the residence of a merchant. Many begun to build more than one tower per palace, leading to the prohibition of having more than one per house (some palaces were split into smaller residences to skip the normative).

torres vigias 1.jpg
Common merchant house in Cádiz in the XVIII century. It resembles other merchant houses aroun the Mediterranean, like the ones in Vencice, with the exception of the watchtower.

1523551474_196885_1523551614_noticia_normal.jpg
Torre Tavira, the highest torre-mirador in Cádiz.

torres_miradores_cadiz-1.jpg
View of the rooftops of Cádiz. There are about 130 torres-mirador in Cádiz, from 160 at the height of the trend.

fotos-de-cadiz6.jpg
Another view of the city rooftops.

tavira-cádiz-andalucia.jpg
Main 4 types of torres-mirador: terraza (flat top), sillón (two levels), garita (with a small structure on top) and mixta (combination of the other 3 types).

Adding a "practical" use to the towers would make them have a reason to be build and maintained besides prestige (not that humans won't do something costly just to brag, there are thousands of examples historically), and above all, would limit them to a certain class of the city (merchants). This way just some districts of Oldtown would have towers, making them more unique and differentiating those neirghborhoods form other places of the city.

My proposal would be to use the style of the towers in Bologna and San Gimignano, the ones alredy discussed here, but adding the fuctionality that the torres-mirador of Cádiz developed. If for some reason this idea is ditched, I think some city on Essos would benefit from it anyways (Pentos is said to have many square birck towers and could have originated a trend that merchants of other cities copied).
 
slowly takes out presentation to raise the mood back

Some may remember that some time ago the possibility of incorporating towers like the ones on Bologna or San Gimignano was mentioned. I really like the idea, and it could be used as a way to add character to certains neighborhoods and districs of the city. There were 2 main explanations exposed as to why noblemen of Oldtown would build these structures: protection and prestige. Both are completely valid, but I would like to add a third one that would make them usefull rigth now: watchtowers.

The biggest merchants and traders, those whose bussines depend heavily on long-distance trade, would erect towers on top of their palaces and estates in order to use them as look-out post for patrolling the arrival and departure of their ships and fleets. These use is directly inspired on the torres-mirador de Cádiz.

Cádiz is a coastal city situated on the southwest of Spain. Located on and island off the mainland (now a peninsula), Cádiz was always a major port, since it was founded by the phoenicians almost 3000 years ago. Moving to the 1500's, when America was colonized, Castille managed the goods that came form the New World by giving just one city the privilege (the monopoly) of trading with the territories overseas. This role was played by Sevilla up until 1717, when the port at the Guadalquivir (the river that runs througth Sevilla) became clogged with silt, and Cadiz was given the monopoly. During almost a century Cádiz was the only city where trade with America was possible. Just like Sevilla before, this lead to the establishment of many merchats and bourgeois in the city. Now is when this newly created merchant class builds this towers as a way of controling their source of income.

Sooner than later to the practical use of this structures was added the prestigious aura that having a tower gave to the residence of a merchant. Many begun to build more than one tower per palace, leading to the prohibition of having more than one per house (some palaces were split into smaller residences to skip the normative).

View attachment 7053
Common merchant house in Cádiz in the XVIII century. It resembles other merchant houses aroun the Mediterranean, like the ones in Vencice, with the exception of the watchtower.

View attachment 7055
Torre Tavira, the highest torre-mirador in Cádiz.

View attachment 7057
View of the rooftops of Cádiz. There are about 130 torres-mirador in Cádiz, from 160 at the height of the trend.

View attachment 7056
Another view of the city rooftops.

View attachment 7054
Main 4 types of torres-mirador: terraza (flat top), sillón (two levels), garita (with a small structure on top) and mixta (combination of the other 3 types).

Adding a "practical" use to the towers would make them have a reason to be build and maintained besides prestige (not that humans won't do something costly just to brag, there are thousands of examples historically), and above all, would limit them to a certain class of the city (merchants). This way just some districts of Oldtown would have towers, making them more unique and differentiating those neirghborhoods form other places of the city.

My proposal would be to use the style of the towers in Bologna and San Gimignano, the ones alredy discussed here, but adding the fuctionality that the torres-mirador of Cádiz developed. If for some reason this idea is ditched, I think some city on Essos would benefit from it anyways (Pentos is said to have many square birck towers and could have originated a trend that merchants of other cities copied).
¡A mí me encantan las Torres, serán inspiraciones fantásticas por Dorne!
 
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¡A mí me encantan las Torres, serán inspiraciones fantásticas por Dorne!
Well, apparently they were influeced by some kind of North African tradition, so... There are many lookout towers in Spanish cities that trace back to al-Ándalus, but used for leisure and viewing the landscape. But that's for another time ;)

EDIT: I would make a post about it in inspo.
 
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Luciano_I

Well, apparently they were influeced by some kind of North African tradition, so... There are many lookout towers in Spanish cities that trace back to al-Ándalus, but used for leisure and viewing the landscape. But that's for another time ;)
Hey Azulejo, thats very interesting, specially cause u can see that influence later in the colonies, here in Montevideo we have a tipe of house with those towers near the port, of course not in a medieval style.