Homiesucc Builder Application

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Homiesucc

Bard
What is your Minecraft username?
Homiesucc

What is your age?
17-20

In what country are you living?
Russia

Where did you first hear about WesterosCraft?
Youtube

What do you like the most about GoT/ASoIaF?
I apologise for any bad english. It is not my native language. My favourite thing about ASoIaF is probably the depth of the world combined with the medieval setting. I really enjoy the characters too, like "Tyrion Lannister" and the wall.

What is your favorite build on our server?
Winterfell. I really like giant castles like that.

Why do you want to join our server?
I want to build. I have participated in various other minecraft projects, mostly in russian however.

Imgur Album: https://imgur.com/a/ZwUzl9W

Did you follow the application rules?
You know nothing, Jon Snow
 
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Homiesucc

Bard
Got bored and made a duskendale styled house. Bookshelfs will be covered by walls for adjacent house.
The targaeryan symbol is something I wanted to include. In the first book, Viserys and Illyrio often talk about people in westeros creating secret targaeryan banners as they wait for their true king to return. I wanted to include that maybe some mad person actually *was* doing that.
 

Arkilstorm

Dowager Countess of Grantham
Hi Homie!

Lovely application house and apologies for the late reply – It seems like a busy week for a lot of the team this past week.

Your house is a lovely example of a small rural cottage, and your use of materials is spot on. My only advice would be to make sure your timber pattern is a little more interesting. Using cross and diagonal timbering on even one layer would greatly add to the aesthetics and add a tad more believability to the strength of the structure.

Great job with adding rafters to your roof and showing the odd bit of wear and tear in the exposed wood beneath.


Let's kick off with your first challenge build. Can you please build a low-class chandler (candlemaker)'s house in the style of /warp woodwright.
Look for inspiration in the houses on the main road through the town. Once you've built your house in single-player, please post the screenshots here.

Good luck!
 

Homiesucc

Bard
Hi Homie!

Lovely application house and apologies for the late reply – It seems like a busy week for a lot of the team this past week.

Your house is a lovely example of a small rural cottage, and your use of materials is spot on. My only advice would be to make sure your timber pattern is a little more interesting. Using cross and diagonal timbering on even one layer would greatly add to the aesthetics and add a tad more believability to the strength of the structure.

Great job with adding rafters to your roof and showing the odd bit of wear and tear in the exposed wood beneath.


Let's kick off with your first challenge build. Can you please build a low-class chandler (candlemaker)'s house in the style of /warp woodwright.
Look for inspiration in the houses on the main road through the town. Once you've built your house in single-player, please post the screenshots here.

Good luck!
 
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Arkilstorm

Dowager Countess of Grantham
Hey Homie! Very nice and speedy build. :)

Here's a bit of feedback:

- With your stone palette, be careful not to put light stone too close to brickwork; the palette is designed to show weathering and a gradual fade through tones is best. You've already got the main palette down, but you're missing the small reach brick between the larger bricks and the light tone blocks.

- Try not to mount shop signs from the roof. This was actually done in the medieval period, but it's tricky to pull off in Minecraft. It's better off the front of the building or hanging from the roof overhang.

- With your stone windows, try not to use arrow slits as they're very narrow. This may be a bit confusing as these blocks are called "windows" but if you search for "arrow slit" you'll find windows similar to the oak timber window you have at the top of the house.

- With the wooden level of your house, try not to make the mix of oak vertical wood / jungle vertical wood appear too checkerboardy. The weathering looks good, but just keep an eye on that.

- Inside, your house, the rafters should span the shortest distance between two walls, rather than the length of the whole building.

- With a house of this size, try separating the front of the ground floor as a workroom, with the back as a private kitchen area. You could divide up the space with oak half-doors or with the staircase to the upper floor. A slate-roofed house of this size and class should have stairs to the upper floor rather than a ladder.

- Upstairs, think about splitting the space between a seating area and a bedroom. Try not to mix the type of beds either.

- Your rafters are great but make sure that the rafter blocks at the top of the roof appear to connect to the stair blocks in some way. At the moment, your wooden blocks at the top are a bit too far away from the other rafters to look supportive.

Super first go at a challenge build!
For your next challenge. Please build a low-class spicer's house in the style of The Tor (/warp thetor)

Good luck!
 
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Arkilstorm

Dowager Countess of Grantham
Hi Homie, I’ll be sure to give you feedback on your build this weekend. You were very quick with your builds and I’m conscious not to quick-fire through your application build process, and give you time to explore the server a little between challenges.

I’ll send over the feedback on this build over the next couple of days.
 

Arkilstorm

Dowager Countess of Grantham
Hey Homie, this is a great build, and here are a few pointers:

  • The bottom of your stone palette looks a little too uniform; try not to have an almost zig-zag like weathering pattern, but instead make it look like a natural deterioration of the plaster. This can be achieved by putting most of the damage around doors, windows, and other weak points.

  • Adding wood to the roof to show repair work is great, but when there’s as much wood as there is slate, they would probably have replaced the whole roof by now. Consider using less wood, or as with the weathering of the palette, keep it to the weaker areas.

  • Inside, try to avoid using full oak logs – they’re massive and we’ve moved away from using them in in house building, unless the structure is meant to be built of full tree trunks.

  • Try to avoid using brewing stands. They’re a great addition to an alchemist, or for maesters, but this house is meant to be that of a trader rather than a more learned profession.

  • Try using oak hoppers / slabs / half doors, or other blocks for your counters rather than just oak stair blocks – it can look a little simple, and isn’t always illustrative of real-world furniture.

  • Your ceiling rafters are very close together. Try to mix upside-down stair blocks and slabs to create wider spacing between your rafters for the floor above.

  • The upper floor is a little sparse – consider using a wall or screen to separate the living space from the sleeping space. This house is large enough for a family, but looks to be inhabited by a single person or couple. Consider making the table usable rather than against the wall, to use the space better. If you have the table stored away, don’t forget that the chairs need to be present too!

  • Your chimney shouldn’t be entirely visible in the wall – the chimney is likely to be made of the same material and wouldn’t stand out as much.

For your next challenge, please build a high-class tailor's shop in the style of High Garden town - /warp hgtown

Good luck!
 

Arkilstorm

Dowager Countess of Grantham
Hi Homie,

Thanks for your patience, I've had a look at this most recent build and have some feedback below. It's a great start at this house style, but I definitely think you should spend some more time exploring the builds and get a bit of an understanding of how these spaces should work, rather than just what should be in them. There are a few instances where the layout is a little odd, or there are materials that should really be swapped out. These things come with exploration and experience and I'm sure you'll pick them up in no time!

  • Your stone palette works in principle but is a little lackluster. Consider mixing up the blocks into more diagonal wear and tear patterns rather than straight lines. Also, the use of whiteharbor stone is reserved for larger structures in Highgarden like the town hall, guilds, and gatehouses. Houses shouldn’t use the white stone palette at all. The use of white stone at the back is slightly strange too.. The palette is meant to show a natural weathering of plaster and stone and not bands of dark to light tones. There are lots of examples in the town of how the stone palette should be employed – best to take a wander and note the more cobbled or rougher hewn stone around weak points such as doorways, windows, and heavy traffic areas around corners also.

  • The façade is nice, but I’d definitely consider using oak timber window frames with shutters in some places rather than all glass. Glass was expensive to produce and purchase, and should be used sparingly. Not every window would be fitted with glass.

  • Your rear façade is very plain. Most of these structures in Highgarden have small yards or look onto another street, so should have windows/doors etc on all sides that aren’t shared with another structure.

  • Consider using other timber blocks, besides just the bottom row with a grid pattern above – this looks a little odd and doesn’t show consideration for how the upper layers were built. Usually, the top part would be sectioned into rooms from the outset, with the placing of timbers partially visible from the outside, through the way the daub and wattle timbering is patterned. Using plain daub to infill areas is a good way of showing this. It works particularly well with asymmetric buildings, such as this.

  • With a lot of houses, the timbering will only occur at the front and rear of the house, with the sides comprised of stone to support the roof structure. On either end of the building, consider making these fully out of stone – it also helps to support your chimney.

  • Your shop has a nice layout, though I’d consider putting the counter nearer the door, and the workshop behind it, to keep travelers kicking dust into the workroom off the road. Be careful also that your fireplace ash from the floor above is visible in the wall. This can be hidden by making sure your rafters begin at the fireplace side of the building.

  • Your main living room is nice and large, and the small kitchen area is a tad on the small side, but works. The upper floor layout is quite confusing, and I’m not sure if it’s achieved the look of a relatively wealthy merchant’s home. Again, you’ve mixed the thatch bed and straw bed, which should be avoided, and the first room looks like a poor family bedroom, but in a wealthy home this doesn’t really make sense. There also is no sign of any furniture such as closets, baskets, clothing, etc.

    What I assume is the master bedroom is also a little sparse. With the addition of the wall and double doors between the two sleeping areas, you’ve lost a lot of space that could better be used as a workroom/bedroom or two sleeping areas partitioned off.

As I've already said, a lot of this comes with practice, and I'm sure you'll pick it up in no time. With that in mind, I'm happy to approve your application and for you to move onto the next stage of probation. Welcome to the team!

Please reach out to a moderator in-game and they'll promote you to a new-builder, and in the meantime, start yourself a new probation thread in the probation subforum and a probie leader will walk you through the next steps.

Have fun!
 
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