Azulejo's Dorne Repository

Azulejo

Royal Messenger
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Marcas dornienses wide.jpg
Azulejo's Dorne Repository

Welcome everyone!

As many of you already know, I have quite a soft spot for Dorne. Thus, many of the ideas and propositons I make tend to be about this single region of Westeros. That's why I decided to create this thread: here I will be posting any inspiration or suggestions I find interesitg for the Undefeated Kingdom™, keeping them ordered under one spot, instead of flooding the Inspiration and Worldbuilding forum with lots of individual threads. This is not an individual effort, everyone is encouraged to interact, react and post here whatever they feel like, as feedback is the best way to create awesome projects. Hope this becomes an active and beloved part of Westeroscraft!
Azulejo
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ADR 1: Glazed tiles and colored roofing in al-Ándalus and the Maghreb


ADR 2: Flooring options for Dornish buildings
 
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Azulejo

Royal Messenger
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ADR 1: Glazed tiles and colored roofing in al-Ándalus and the Maghreb
Tiles (tejas) were one of the most used roofing options in Moorish Iberia. The most common was the Monk and Nun style (known as teja árabe in Spanish, I know, shocking), which can be traced back before Romans expanded its use. Of course you won't spect a wealthy merchant, a high administration employee or a prestigious mosque to use the same tiles as a humble artisan or a peasant. That's where glazed roof tiles appear.

More prestigious buildings in al-Andalus tend to use glazed tiles to trim the angles of their roofs. The most common combination by far was an alternating design of white and green tiles.

copia telhado-octogonal-do-palácio-de-nasrid-alhambra-102294204.jpg
copia roof-detail-inside-alhambra-palace-23587222.jpgMCAD-Library_VisualHunt.jpg
Green and white glazed roof tiles in the Alhambra of Granada

The tradition continued way after the Christian kingdoms conquered all of the Muslim territories, carried on by muslims living under their rule (mudéjares).

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Roofs of the Palacio del Rey Don Pedro in the Reales Alcazáres of Seville

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Various buidings in the Albayzín neighborhood in Granada

Not only the angles of the roofs where decorated with glazed tiles, some used them for bigger sections.

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Chruch in Granada.

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Section of the roof of Casa de Pilatos, a palace in Seville from the XVI century that fuses mudéjar style with the Italian Renaissance

Continues on the next post...
 

Azulejo

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Continues on the next post...
In the Maghreb glazed tiles were used to cover the whole of the roof, specially in green
p2738371940-4.jpg23970521-roof-of-the-university-of-al-karaouine-in-fez-morocco-which-is-the-oldest-continually...jpg
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Various mosques in Fez and nearby towns

In game this style could be translated easily. Green and white trimmining, however, can look chunky. This is why it should be reserved to bigger buildings, so it doesn't overpower the rest of the roof. It shouldn't be hard, as is a style reserved preferably for important and grand buildings. I tried it in Vanilla MC, using quartz and dark prismarine.
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This is looking brilliant, Azulejo. I was wondering myself about different tiles and possible painted bricks to distinguish Dornish builds from the Westerlands just this morning and this is exactly it. Are you telepathic? :p

I do believe that image is of a Dornish army on the Dornish Marches, rather than in Dorne itself, if a caption on the wiki of ice and fire is correct. Still a relevant image, just making a note.

This is great stuff, thank you and if you need my post deleted for coherency of the thread, go for it
 

Azulejo

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Azulejo. I was wondering myself about different tiles and possible painted bricks to distinguish Dornish builds from the Westerlands just this morning and this is exactly it. Are you telepathic? :p
Great minds think alike :D. One of the posts I'm plannig to make will feature two alternative palettes for Dorne aside the one we already have. I was thinking red sandstone/tapial and brick. I'll go deeper on this later, but red i think would be cool for southern Dorne, specially in the red sand deserts, while brick would be good for the rivers (Greenblood, Vaith and Scourge). In any case this regions would not affect finished projects, as to not outdate them. If you are looking for colored bricks as decoration, I suggest checking mudéjar art, as it features glazed bicks quite frequently.
calle-de-toledo.jpg3050f5ea0fbb90091ebee2cde26e6548.jpgiglesia-santa-marc3ada.jpg320px-Utebo_-_Torre_de_la_iglesia_Editada.jpgarte mudejar.jpg
Riverside cities like Toledo or Zaragoza feature many buildings made with bricks
visita-guiada-banos-encina.jpgBeautiful-Decorations-in-the-Streets-of-Marrakech.jpgMarrakech-Morocco-Things-to-Do-Medina-Narrow-Streets-Door-Cat.jpg138021.jpgalbarracin.jpg
Tapial is a construction technique that uses compacted clay soil for building up walls. Red sandstone would be abundant in regions where this rock dominates
My aproach to this two alterntive styles was quite similar to the one you pointed out: finding unique features for the region that could differentiate Dorne from the rest of Westeros, specially the Westerlands (which already has colored plasters, red brick, brick and wattle and daub and wattle).

I do believe that image is of a Dornish army on the Dornish Marches, rather than in Dorne itself, if a caption on the wiki of ice and fire is correct. Still a relevant image, just making a note.
It is, indeed. I used it because I really like it, and although it represents the Marches, it does resemble quite well what I image Eastern Dorne would look like (less grassy though), which is said to be dry and with stony soil ill-suited for ariculture.
Most of Dorne south of the Red Mountains is an arid wasteland. Eastern Dorne largely consists of dry, stony soil ill-suited for agriculture, while western Dorne contains deserts of red and white sand.
World of Ice and Fire via AWOIAF

if you need my post deleted for coherency of the thread, go for it
There's not need to! Comments and feedback, as I said before, is encouraged and well received. I link the posts in the first one so people can navigate easily, and discussion can take place without fear of burying the info I/other people post.
 

Azulejo

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Thank you! I'm glad it shows! To be fair this isn't super hard for me, as al-Ándalus is what as an Historian I would like to study/investgate/teach in the future, and I have many sources accumulated over the years. It also helps a lot that this is part of my culture, even though I'm from the region that traditionally wans't conquered *coughs*, and far away from any remarkable remains from Muslim Iberia, excluding defense systems and such. Put me in Northern Europe and I will strugle XD. Until I started studiying more deeply European history, complex wattle and daub was almost fantasy to me.
 

Azulejo

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ADR 2: Flooring options for Dornish buildings
boy it took a long time for another one of this

Floors are often an overlooked part of a project, a mistake I make too. It is very easy to focus your creative effort on the walls and realize that you have not thought anything for the floor, so you put any stone slab that "matches" the walls and call it a day. I'm here to show you the wide variety of designs that one could choose.

In Iberia and the Maghreb most houses would probably have a rammed earth floor. Usually clay is mixed in with the regular soil, adding hydrophobic and hygenic properties, giving it a reddish hue.This technique has been use way before the Roman conquest, showing how the commoner's house doesn't change that much in long periods of time.

InShot_20210611_181424225 (1).jpg
First image is a reconstruction of an Iberian house, dating around III b.C. As you can see, is quite similar to the medieval examples to the right (also look at that GOURGEOS red patterned plint. Red stripes alongside the bottom of walls are also a recurring theme. They are painted with almagra, a reddish clay based pigment with high concentrations of iron)

Another option for all kinds of spaces are pebbles. Known as guijarros or chinas in Spanish, they are a cheap and multifunctional option that can be used in streets, courtyards, stables and utilitarian spaces. Pebble floring doesn´t create ponds, as the nooks and cranies between the stones act as little drainage canals. Also, if water pools on them, evaporation can help reduce the temperature of the area, thus making this flooring ideal in hot climates. This style is mostly used on the outside, as pebbles are too bumpy for room flooring.

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As you can see, pebble flooring was used widely: if a street was paved, most likely it would've been with this. Peebles weren't just thrown in any manner. At least they were arranged on lines, and in fancier spaces desings where created anternating direction and color

Brick floring is a little bit upscale, but still very common. A spin on the rammed earth, brick floors can be used on both the inside and the outside. It's usually placed diagonally to the walls (either in a romboid pattern if square or fishtail), with a trim in brick or tile if necessary. Fancier houses and buildings add tile desings inbetween the bricks.

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Brick floors are quite common in city houses, I would say medium class and upwards

Stone slabs are also an option. In more humble houses they are usually reserved for the perimeter of the courtyard, wich is usually raised (or rather the courtyard is sunken, I would expand on that in the future), at the openings of the doors, the entrance (the zaguhán), the latrine and/or the sleeping quarters.

InShot_20210611_182510824 (1).jpg
In case someone is interested in the floorplan of the house, from bottom to top and from left to right the rooms are entrance (it says façade, but the room itself is the "lobby", used as workspace too), kitchen, latrine, courtyard, sleeping quarters and living spaces). This would be a medium house at the outskirts of the city. Keep in mind Islamic families are extended, thus more people are iving together and birnging income, allowing such commodities.

Mansions, palaces and public buildings display a wide arrange of stone floors, going from wonderfully polished marbles to limestone, granites and such. It should be noted that even in this cases the slabs are rarelly regular, most of the time the pieces are of different sizes and shapes.

InShot_20210611_182704894 (1).jpg
They look nice huh? The ones at the left are new, but you get the idea.

Despite the common use on walls, full tile flooring is not very common. In al-Andalus only regular reddish tile, unglazed, was used widely as a full floor option. There are some examples of rooms with tile floors in some Late Middle Ages palaces, like the Alhambra and the Reales Alcazares. It seems like the use of tiles as floors appeared massively in the Modern Age, from the 1400s or 1500s onwards. Thus why this style can be seem mostly on Morrocco, Algeria, Tunis and the mudéjar style in Spain and Portugal, developed under Christian control. Despite this I personally think is still usable, since it doesn't go way over our main time period inspiration.

InShot_20210611_183416619 (1).jpg
I don't think I need to mention the cooling propieties of full tiled rooms, but on hot summer nights the are a life savior. Blue, green, ocher, red, black and yellow are the most common colours

If needed I would add a zoom in version of all this variants, so it would be easier to create a texture based on them if desired or look for "dupes" that already exist in the launcher.​