Planning Riverlands: Types of trees and forests

Wazgamer

Lord Paramount of The Riverlands
Pronouns
they/them
Hi! I’ve been wondering recently what the consensus is for the types of trees that are found in the Riverlands. Throughout my time as builder there Alder trees were my go to. However I wanted to branch out from that alone and potentially get something more fitting.

imo the riverlands is very similar to the Scottish lowlands, and Northern England in the north but then transitions to the Low countries as you head south. I can speak for the UK at least and say that the alder and for example oak and willows trees would fit. But it would be nice to have more variation.

Thanks - waz
 
  • Like
Reactions: Flip90

AerioOndos

Donkey Lord
I agree with your northern England idea for terrain style. I've actually had the idea that the Blue Fork headwaters around Sevenstreams could be an alder carr/wooded fen as to feel different from the Neck and any wetlands along the edge of the green fork. If I remember correctly there is a reasonably large wetland of primarily alder in Yorkshire, but I don't remember the name.

Poplar is another water loving plant and is used in the Reach a lot. Another possibility is linden or small-leafed lime, which would like river and stream banks in upland areas (like lolliston). Another possibility is Sycamore, which in my experience are a weed in wet areas and Beech trees should be more predominant near the Red Fork due to their preference for clayey soils.

When it comes to forests, think about colour combinations with the house styles you are doing. Jungle and Spruce leaves work really well with darker wood and stone mixes, while Birch heavy forest mixtures are brilliant for brighter buildings.

Now I'm not a botanist, this is just the result of my own observations and a 5 minute google. Please correct anything.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Wazgamer and Flip90

Wazgamer

Lord Paramount of The Riverlands
Pronouns
they/them
I agree with your northern England idea for terrain style. I've actually had the idea that the Blue Fork headwaters around Sevenstreams could be an alder carr/wooded fen as to feel different from the Neck and any wetlands along the edge of the green fork. If I remember correctly there is a reasonably large wetland of primarily alder in Yorkshire, but I don't remember the name.

Poplar is another water loving plant and is used in the Reach a lot. Another possibility is linden or small-leafed lime, which would like river and stream banks in upland areas (like lolliston). Another possibility is Sycamore, which in my experience are a weed in wet areas and Beech trees should be more predominant near the Red Fork due to their preference for clayey soils.

When it comes to forests, think about colour combinations with the house styles you are doing. Jungle and Spruce leaves work really well with darker wood and stone mixes, while Birch heavy forest mixtures are brilliant for brighter buildings.

Now I'm not a botanist, this is just the result of my own observations and a 5 minute google. Please correct anything.
That was really insightful Aerio, I will definitely keep it in mind! Thanks
 

AerioOndos

Donkey Lord
Oh that is brilliant! It also gives a possible answer to the question of what 'blackbriar' is in ASoIaF. Blackthorn essentially means the same thing, so potentially we just use them as different names for the same tree.
Buckthorns also like wet areas and are a pest in areas of Ireland (specifically Sea Buckthorn, which is found across Eurasia from the Black Sea into the Himalayas) and most other varieties are pests in the USA.
As I was mentioning earlier, limes would be good for the area. The large-leafed, small-leafed (linden) and common lime all fit the climate.
Black Poplar is another brilliant plant to have, though our current schems of it are trimmed trees, rather than the interestingly twisted wild ones. They prefer boggy soil too.

We also need some impressive Yew schems. They'd be great to have in the Dornish Marches, and if a properly intimidating schem can be made, they'd be a good alternative to Weirwoods for creepy trees or Andal heart trees (

Many are applicable. We could definitely use some more big Beech schems, maybe some colourful small bushes like dogwood and elder with maybe cowsparsley as their flowers.
 

Wazgamer

Lord Paramount of The Riverlands
Pronouns
they/them
Oh that is brilliant! It also gives a possible answer to the question of what 'blackbriar' is in ASoIaF. Blackthorn essentially means the same thing, so potentially we just use them as different names for the same tree.
Buckthorns also like wet areas and are a pest in areas of Ireland (specifically Sea Buckthorn, which is found across Eurasia from the Black Sea into the Himalayas) and most other varieties are pests in the USA.
As I was mentioning earlier, limes would be good for the area. The large-leafed, small-leafed (linden) and common lime all fit the climate.
Black Poplar is another brilliant plant to have, though our current schems of it are trimmed trees, rather than the interestingly twisted wild ones. They prefer boggy soil too.

We also need some impressive Yew schems. They'd be great to have in the Dornish Marches, and if a properly intimidating schem can be made, they'd be a good alternative to Weirwoods for creepy trees or Andal heart trees (

Many are applicable. We could definitely use some more big Beech schems, maybe some colourful small bushes like dogwood and elder with maybe cowsparsley as their flowers.
That’s a great way to interpret the blackbriar name imo. Also if i have time a I think I’ll make a couple of black poplars. They look really interesting.

Is there a guide of making schemsets somewhere? When i was mod I remember it being a pretty tricky thing to do.