Professions in Westeros

Endymion

Bookbinder
Hey everyone

Allocating fitting professions is one of the cornerstones of making a nice and immersive project. Getting the right profession in the right spot therefore is key. This is something I personally still struggle with and I feel this is a wider spread sentiment within the community. To make it easier for everyone, I thought we could include a professions guide on our wiki. This could be a list of most professions we have on the server, where they would appear and potential background information. I know we used to have some sort of list like this before but I can't find it and it would most likely have to be updated. A lot of builders have also done extensive research about certain professions. Finding a way to centralize this knowledge would be a great way to prevent people from double researching things and could help other builders to create more accurate depictions of those professions.

The first step would be to create a list of all professions we have on the server. Since there are quite a lot of professions I am looking at the community to crowdsource this. Everyone can submit the professions they can think of. Write the title and include a short description of the profession. When submitting your professions, please read the already submitted professions to ensure you don't submit professions that are already on the thread.

When we have a good list maybe DutchGuard could make a wiki article on this. We could divide it into rural/town/city/... professions. Add regional descriptions such as a water source for a tannery etc.

List of professions:

Accountant/accomptant – keeps track of monies for a businessman or business

Acreman/ackerman - raises and tends oxen

Actor - a person whose profession is acting on the stage.

alchemist – performs alchemy, a branch of chemistry focused on transmutation of metals

Ale conner – civil overseer for ale, beer and bread ensuring their quality and safe and acceptable sale

Apothecary – merchant and maker of medicines, herbs and salves

Architect – designs houses, cities and public works

Arkwright – makes cabinets and chests

Armourer - a maker, supplier, or repairer of weapons or armour

Atilliator/arbalester – crafts crossbows and arbalests

Baker - a person who makes bread and cakes, especially as a trade.

Banker (see deposit banker, merchant banker, moneylender, pawnbroker)

Barber - a person who could perform surgical procedures including bloodletting, cupping therapy, pulling teeth, and amputation. Barbers could also bathe, cut hair, shave or trim facial hair, and give enemas.

Bard - a poet, traditionally one reciting epics and associated with a particular oral tradition.

Barker – announcer for a performance

Basketmaker – makes baskets from stiff plant fibers, baleen or horsehair

Bather – owner of a bathhouse

Bearward – owns, trains and shows off a dancing bear

Beekeeper – raises and tends bees and collects honey and beeswax

Beer merchant – merchant for lagers (cheaper and lighter beers)

Beerbrewer - a person that manufactures beer.

Bellmaker – makes bells from iron, bronze or copper (see campaner)

Blacksmith – crafts and repairs iron and steel products

Bladesmith – makes iron and steel bladed weapons (see: scythesmith, knifemaker, swordsmith, coutelier)

Bleacher – makes paper from wood pulp via bleaching

Bleacher/whitster – bleaches clothes and textiles

Boatman/bargeman/canaller/ferryman/lighterman – people in charge of various ferry boats

Bog iron hunter – collects bog iron (small iron lodes found in bogs and swamps precipitated from iron-rich springwater)

Bonecarver – makes bone art or tools from animal bones, tusks, teeth and antlers

Bookbinder – puts together and mends books with leather or metal, sometimes decorates with gems, ivory or precious metals

Bookmerchant/stationer – merchant for books, scrolls and paper

Boothman – merchant for grain

Bowyer – a person who makes or sells archers' bows.

Brassware maker - a person who makes utensils or other objects made of brass (like candelabras, plates, mantles and hardware).

Brazier – crafts brass products (like candelabras, plates, mantles and hardware)

Brickworker – makes clay bricks

Bronzeworker/bronzefounder – crafts bronze products (like busts, statues, bronze armor)

Brothelkeeper – manages a brothel (pimp)

Brothelworker – a person that works in a brothel. Can be a prostitute.

Buckler maker (?) – makes bucklers- the small shield-like roundels used by fencers

Butcher - a person whose trade is cutting up and selling meat in a shop.

Calligrapher – writes manuscripts (see cleric, scribe)

Campaner – makes large (sept) bells (see bellmaker)

Carder – combs and refines wool or silk

Carpenter – constructs rough wooden products, repairs wooden objects and structures, or works on wooden projects.

Carpetmaker/tapestrymaker -sews carpets/tapestries (very large, ornamental carpets to be hung on walls)

Cartographer – a person who draws or produces maps from information learned from geographers and explorers

Cartwright – a person who makes and mends carts

Chandler - a person who makes and sells candles maked from tallow (beeffat/muttonfat) or beeswax

Chandler – - a dealer in household items such as oil, soap, paint, and groceries.

Charcoalburner – burns wood into charcoal in large, earthen kilns (often disdained and thought to be woodswitches)

Cheesemaker - a person who makes cheese.

Chimney sweep – cleans out the soot from chimneys

Cleric/illuminator/limner – septons who specialize in writing and illuminating (see calligrapher, scribe)

Climmer – hunts for eggs in cliffside nests

Clogmaker – a person who makes clogs, shoes with a thick wooden sole.

Cloth merchant – a person who trades cloth.

Clothmaker/clothier – makes and sells clothes

Cobbler/Cordwainer/Shoemaker - mends and repairs leather shoes

Collier – merchant for coal

Compasssmith – makes compass

Confectioner – makes candies

Cooper - a maker or repairer of casks and barrels.

Coppersmith/redsmith – crafts copper products

Cordwainer/shoemaker – makes leather shoes

Coucher/midwife (m/f)– attends and assists women during late pregnancy, labor and birth

Coutelier/Cutler – crafts small, domestic blades (knives, daggers, scissors and medical instruments), also often works ivory

Crofter – a farmer who tends a small farm (croft)

Cutler - a person who makes or sells cutlery.

Dairymaid – young women who milk cattle

Delver – ditch-digger

Deposit banker – manages and secures monies and makes and procures debts and loans

Diamantaire – diamond-cutter (medieval diamonds were usually left natural, but Westerosi might have figured out diamond-cutting)

Dock worker - a person whose job is putting goods on and taking goods off ships in a port.

Draper - a person who sells textile fabrics.

Dressmaker – makes and mends women’s fitted clothing

Drover – drives sheep and cattle to market

Drywaller/plasterer – builds walls made of drywall or plaster of Paris (obviously not a name used in Westeros), a material made from fired gypsum

Dung carter – collects animal dung and manure, bird excrement and human feces

Dyer – a person that makes dyes from a variety of sources and/or dyes cloth or other material.

Eggler – merchant for eggs

Executioner/justice – executes condemned prisoners

Farmer - a person who owns or manages a farm.

Farrier – applies horseshoes and trims/treats horse hooves
 
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Kai Everlast

Playwright
Herbalist-
A herbalist is someone with the duty of planting medical plants, roots and herbs. Unlike normal farmers/gardeners, they studied the power of plants to heal and defend them from diseases and common cold. Back in the day many herbalist usually worked for the church, where they were given land to plant such crops.
 

StanateeManatee

Playwright
Hey just to get a start on this, here's the list from Stoop's Fairmarket guide plus a couple other normal city professions.

EDIT: I HAVE MOVED AND COMPACTED THE LISTS BELOW TO MAKE THEM MORE READABLE

Also, here is a link to a page with a bunch of potential professions: http://arcana.wikidot.com/list-of-medieval-european-professions . This website is linked elsewhere, but I'll link it here too, but its a list of medieval goods which you can think of the professions making/using them: http://medieval.ucdavis.edu/120D/Money.html .
 
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Endymion

Bookbinder
Some more professions I found that need descriptions

accountant

apothecary

arkwright


bather

beekeeper

bellmaker

bleacher

bog iron hunter

bonecarver

bookbinder

brazier (occupation)


buckle maker

chimney sweep

Crofter


drywaller

executioner

fiddler

Forester

Fortune Teller

Fowler

Fresco painter

gardner


Glasspainter

glover

Guild Master

harness maker

harper


Hawker


Horse trainer


laundress

Leech-collector

limeburner

Limner


master builder

milkmaid

Miller

miner

minter

mirrorer

nailmaker

netmaker

oilmaker

Oyster raker

papermaker

Perfumer

plasterer

playwright

plumer

quarryman

reedmaker

restaurateur

ropemaker

rugmaker

sailmaker

saltboiler

sawyer

scabbard maker

Seaweed harvester

Serf


silk-maker


tapestrymaker

tenter

tile-burner

treadmill worker

trencherman,

Vinter

water carrier

wattler

wheelwright

woodcarver

Woolman

someone selling religious statues, icons etc.
 
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Thamus_Knoward

Shadowbinder
Ranger
I love the initiative! Alas, I think we're retreading old ground here. While knowing all possible occupations is nice, it's also important not to forget that there were only a handful of common occupations in medieval society:

Andy_Jones made a comprehensive post about that here:

Which included a very, very long list of researched job descriptions:
Medieval European Professions

To this I'd also like to add this interactive chart of 150 years of US employment history, starting a bit later than our reference time frame but still serving as an adequate starting point of a society that is not fully industrialized (albeit this is definitely post-industrialisation).


Endymion IMO a google sheet on the basis of Andy's document is a better way of organizing this information for interactive colaboration:
Job Name, Description, Sector, Location

Once that's done you could think of casting that into a table on the wiki.
 
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EStoop

Firemage
A lot of the professions we have listed have little use when plotting a town or city. A fisherman, bricklayer and thief for example will have nothing to resemble their profession at their house.
  • A fisherman works on a boat, either his own or someone else's, and sells the fish to a fishmonger. No fisherman will store his catch of the day at home so it can rot for a couple of days before selling.
  • A bricklayer works on a brickyard, most likely not owned by himself. He doesn't make any at home, nor does he takes them with him.
  • A thief doesn't have a real profession at all. A very succesful thief would probably hide his stash someplace else than his home. A smaller thief would hide his loot between his own stuff, and probably wouldn't have anything lying around indicating his "profession".
Most places employ a number of people, either in the form of apprentices or as simple workers. In my opinion, professions should be considered seperately from residences, as most people in a town or city would not work from home (especially among the lower class).
When you consider professions that way, they can be devided into three categories:
  • Shops, places where products or services are sold, but not neccesarily made. These places are common on the ground floor of a house, since the profession does not require a lot of space. Think of traders, herbalists and perfumers, but also tailors and locksmiths.
  • Workshops, places where products are made. You can buys stuff here, but the odds of finding these professions on the ground floor of a regular house are low. These places need space, like a blacksmith, brickworks or ropewalk. A septry is a collection of workshops, with illuminators, brewers and whatever else they produce.
  • Farms, places where products are grown, stored and processed (yes, for simplicity's sake this includes the fishing industry). These are similar to workshops but are often more rural in nature.
Beside this, a lot of professions are practiced in specific seasons or under specific circumstances.
  • Brickmaking is a seasonal profession, often done when the water in the river is low so the clay can be "harvested". In winter the river is high again and deposits clay that can be used to make bricks. A brickmaker in medieval Europe would not sit on his hands in the winter but would pick up another profession he/she can practice during this time. A brickmaker in Westeros would do the same, especially considering the length of the seasons (the effect this would have on brickyards, or any other seasonal job, is an entirely different discussion).
  • Basket making was often done in "spare time", as it does not require a lot of skill or tools. Other professions that do not require a large skillset or expensive materials, tools and space were more often than not practiced by regular folk rather than professionals.
 
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StanateeManatee

Playwright
Those are great points, but for the sake of making a good compendium, I will still add my two-cents. Plus, I personally like thinking of what a occupation a person does, even if there are no indicators we could or should put in WC, instead of just labeling them "townsperson." Anyway, Here's my updated list:


Note: Many of the jobs that were acceptable to be performed by women sometimes have different names. If ending in “-er”, the female suffix may be “-ess” or “-ress” (though it often stays “-er”. If “-or”, it may be changed to “-ix” or “-rix”. Or, obviously “-man” becomes “-woman”. Also, the primary part of the word might change and “woman”, “maid” or “lady” might be placed afterward and some of these will be noted as in accoucher.


accoucher/midwife (m/f)– attends and assists women during late pregnancy, labor and birth
accountant/accomptant – keeps track of monies for a businessman or business
acreman/ackerman - raises and tends oxen
alchemist – performs alchemy, a branch of chemistry focused on transmutation of metals
ale conner – civil overseer for ale, beer and bread ensuring their quality and safe and acceptable sale
ale merchant – merchant of ales (darker, yeastier beers)
apothecary – merchant and maker of medicines, herbs and salves
architect – designs houses, cities and public works
arkwright – makes cabinets and chests
armorer – makes armor out of leather, chain or plate
atilliator/arbalester – crafts crossbows and arbalests
barker – announcer for a performance
banker (see deposit banker, merchant banker, moneylender, pawnbroker)
barber (or barber-chirurgeon(surgeon)) – minor surgeon who performs dentistry, bloodletting and embalming, also cuts hair and gives shaves
basketmaker – makes baskets from stiff plant fibers, baleen or horsehair
bather – owner of a bathhouse
bearward – owns, trains and shows off a dancing bear
beekeeper – raises and tends bees and collects honey and beeswax
beer merchant – merchant for lagers (cheaper and lighter beers)
beerbrewer – makes beer
bellmaker – makes bells from iron, bronze or copper (see campaner)
blacksmith – crafts iron and steel products
bladesmith – makes iron and steel bladed weapons (see: scythesmith, knifemaker, swordsmith, coutelier)
bleacher – makes paper from wood pulp via bleaching
bleacher/whitster – bleaches clothes and textiles
boatman/bargeman/canaller/ferryman/lighterman – people in charge of various ferry boats
bog iron hunter – collects bog iron (small iron lodes found in bogs and swamps precipitated from iron-rich springwater)
bonecarver – makes bone art or tools from animal bones, tusks, teeth and antlers
bookbinder – puts together and mends books with leather or metal, sometimes decorates with gems, ivory or precious metals
bookmerchant/stationer – merchant for books, scrolls and paper
boothman – merchant for grain
bowyer – crafts bows for hunting and archery
brazier – crafts brass products (like candelabras, plates, mantles and hardware)
brickworker – makes clay bricks
bronzeworker/bronzefounder – crafts bronze products (like busts, statues, bronze armor)
brothelkeeper – manages a brothel (pimp)
brothelworkers/prostitutes - service worker who specializes in sexual and carnal pleasure
buckle maker – makes buckles (? like for barrels and straps ?)
buckler maker (?) – makes bucklers- the small shield-like roundels used by fencers
calligrapher – writes manuscripts (see cleric, scribe)
campaner – makes large (sept) bells (see bellmaker)
carder – combs and refines wool or silk
carpenter – constructs rough wooden products or works on wooden projects
carpetmaker/tapestrymaker -sews carpets/tapestries (very large, ornamental carpets to be hung on walls)
cartographer – makes maps from information learned from geographers and explorers
cartwright – makes and mends carts
chandler – makes candles from tallow (beeffat/muttonfat) or beeswax
cheesemaker – makes cheese
chimney sweep – cleans out the soot from chimneys
charcoalburner – burns wood into charcoal in large, earthen kilns (often disdained and thought to be woodswitches)
cleric/illuminator/limner – septons who specialize in writing and illuminating (see calligrapher, scribe)
climmer – hunts for eggs in cliffside nests
clogmaker – carves wood and works leather to make clogs (wooden shoes)
clothmaker/clothier – makes and sells clothes
cobbler – mends and repairs shoes
collier – merchant for coal
compasssmith – makes compass
confectioner – makes candies
coppersmith/redsmith – crafts copper products
cordwainer/shoemaker – makes leather shoes
coutelier/cutler – crafts small, domestic blades (knives, daggers, scissors and medical instruments), also often works ivory
crofter – a farmer who tends a small farm (croft)
dairymaid – young women who milk cattle
delver – ditch-digger
deposit banker – manages and secures monies and makes and procures debts and loans
diamantaire – diamond-cutter (medieval diamonds were usually left natural, but Westerosi might have figured out diamond-cutting)
draper – maker or merchant for clothing
dressmaker – makes and mends women’s fitted clothing
drover – drives sheep and cattle to market
drywaller/plasterer – builds walls made of drywall or plaster of Paris (obviously not a name used in Westeros), a material made from fired gypsum
dung carter – collects animal dung and manure, bird excrement and human feces
dyer – makes dyes from a variety of sources
eggler – merchant for eggs
executioner/justice – executes condemned prisoners
farrier – applies horseshoes and trims/treats horse hooves
fewterer – raises and tends greyhounds and other fast hunting dogs (see kenneler)
fiddler – crafts violins/fine stringed instruments
fiddler/geiger – plays violins/fine stringed instruments
fishmonger – merchant for fish
fletcher – crafts arrows
forester/wood – manages a forest for a lord/king by safeguarding it from bandits and poachers and by negotiating timbering and lumbering
fortuneteller/soothsayer/seer – claims to see the future and gives anecdotal advice to listeners
fowler – hunts wildfowl (wild cickens, turkeys, geese, ducks, pheasants, pigeons, ptarmigans, quails, bobwhites, cranes, woodcocks, partridges, storks, pelicans, gulls, albatrosses and etcetera)
fresco painter – paints artwork on wet lime plaster (different from PoP)\
fruitier/costermonger – merchant for fresh fruit
fueller – merchant for firewood, charcoal, peat or other fuels (see collier, woodmonger)
fuller/tucker/walker – beats and cleans wool
furrier – works hides and pelts to make fur products like rugs and clothes
gardener – tends a garden (faut cultivar notre jardin, lol)
goatherd - raises and tends goats
glassblower/gaffer – makes hollow glass products by glassblowing, an ancient and really cool practice
glasspainter – stains glass and makes art out of it
glover – makes gloves
goldsmith/goldbeater – crafts gold products
gravedigger – digs graves in cemeteries, a very poor and shunned job
grazier/cattleman – raises and tends beef cattle/kine
greengrocer – merchant for vegetables (and fruit (see fruitier)
guild master – manages a guild (essesentially the medieval version of a labor union, but exclusively for craftsmen, artisans and merchants)
haberdasher – makes men’s hats
harnessmaker/lorimer – makes harnesses and horse tack
harper – makes harps
harpist – plays harp
hatmaker - (see haberdasher, milliner)
hawker – hawks (quick-sells) goods door-to-door
hawker/sperviter/falconer/austringer – breeds, trains and hunts with hawks/sparrow hawks/ falcons/eagles
hay merchant – merchant for hay and straw
hayward – manages peasant farming and overseeing the day-to-day operations and activities of the farmers, livestock and storage facilities
herald – officer of arms for a lord or governor, often ferries and proclaims messages, primary vessel for diplomacy
hetheleder – merchant for heather
horse trainer – trains horses for riding and working
hostler/ostler – grooms horses at an inn
hunter – hunts game
innkeeper – manages an inn where people can dine, drink and sleep
ironmonger – merchant of smithy products
jeweller – makes jewelry and works gemstones
joiner – crafts wooden products without the use of nails and minimal glue
kenneler - raises and tends dogs
kennel master – cares for a kennel of dogs
knacker - collects dead and rotting animals and renders them into byproducts (like glue, bones, tallow)
lampwright – makes lamps
lancier – lance maker
lapidary – engraves and polishes precious stones and gemstones (not including diamonds)
latoner – (latten is a medieval catchall for copper alloys like brass and bronze) (see bronzeworker, brazier, bellmaker, campaner, mirrorer)
launder – cleans and launders clothes
leadworker – makes lead products (like architectural accoutremants (gutters, pipes, cistern linings (see plumber)), toys, weights and decorations)
leech-collector – collects leeches from swamps for the purposes of leeching (non-scarring blood-letting)
lensgrinder – grinds glass into optical lenses, seeing glasses and mirrors
limeburner – burns calcium-rich materials (limestone, chalk, seashells) to produce quicklime
linen armorer – makes armor from linen and glue
linener/linen-draper – makes linen shirts
locksmith – crafts and mends locks and other intricate iron machines
lumberjack – fells trees (see woodcutter, woodworker)
lutenist – plays the lute
luthier – crafts stringed instruments, namely lutes
 

StanateeManatee

Playwright
mailer – enamels fancy plate armor (obviously very common in Westeros lol)
malemaker – makes leather trunks
marler – digs in bogs and along shorelines for marl, a lime-rich rock used as fertilizer
marleywoman – sews marley, a fabric for embroidery
mason/bricklayer – a layman who builds out of clay bricks, stone or cinderblocks
master builder – lead mason on a project
mercer – merchant who deals in textiles, fabrics and fine clothes
merchant banker – insures merchants and traders
miller – operates a mill (usu. flourmill)
milliner – makes women’s hats
miner – works in a mine (there are many types of mines)
minstrel/bard/troubadour – various types of singers who recite/sing poetry
minter – runs a mint, makes coinage
mirrorer – makes mirrors (by coating glass with lead (later a silver amalgam) or by beating a reflective metal (bronze, silver or tin)
molecatcher - performs pest control by hunting down moles which ruin crops and gardens
moneychanger – exchanges monies and valuables
mummer – a pantomime actor
nailmaker – makes nails
nakerer – drums a naker (a small kettledrum)
netmaker – weaves ropes into nets
oil merchant/oynter – merchant for oils
oilmaker – processes animal fats (tallow and blubber) or vegetable oils into refined oils
oyster raker – uses a rake to gather oysters in shallow water
papermaker – makes paper from pulping cotton or wood
parchmenter – makes parchment from animal skins
pasteler/pastrycook – bakes or makes pastries, such as pies (pieman/pie-seller), cakes, cookies, custards, pancakes, wafers (waferer) and doughnuts
pawnbroker – loans out money with the insurance of pawned items
perfumer – crafts scented perfumes
perukier – makes wigs
pewterer – crafts products from pewter (a tin-lead alloy)
pinder - performs pest control by catching stray cats and dogs and impounding them
pioneer/sapper/siege engineer – military specialist in siege warfare
piper – plays pipes
player/actor – performs in plays
playwright – writes theatre plays
plumber – works lead into pipes and pipefittings
plumer – merchant of feathers
poet – writes poetry
poleturner – makes polearms
porter – carries goods (usually specialized to a certain business operation)
porter/gatekeeper/doorman – manages passage through a door or gate
potter/disher – makes clay pots and dishes
poulterer – merchant of live fowl (chickens, geese, ducks, pigeons and turkeys) and hares
purse maker – makes purses, used by women to carry money, prayer beads or writing pads
pursuivant – a junior herald (see herald)
quarryman – works in a stone quarry, breaking up and ferrying rocks
quilter – makes quilts (woven textiles sewn together into a patchy blanket)
rag and bone man – collects refuse door-to-door
ratcatcher – performs pest control by hunting down rats which carry disease and spoil stores
rectifier – distills alcohol
reedmaker – makes woodwind instruments (pipes, bagpipes, recorders, flageolets, sackbuts)
restaurateur – operates a restaurant, a place that patrons can dine
ropemaker – makes rope from hemp
rugmaker – weaves or sews rugs
saddlemaker – makes saddles
sailmaker – sews and mends boat sails
saltboiler – boils seawater to obtain seasalt
sartor – patches and mends clothes
scribe/scrivener/amanuensis – a profession writer (this is duty is often fulfilled by maesters, when available) (see calligrapher, cleric)
scullion/scullery maid (m/f) – performs the lowest tasks in the kitchens (such as scrubbing pots and plates(in the scullery))
sculptor – makes statues and busts
scythesmith – makes reaping scythes
seamster – sews clothing
seaweed harvester – gathers seaweed for food and medicine
septon/septa – the religious leaders of the faith
sexton – secular caretaker of a church (this might not exist in Westeros due to the similar name)
shepherd – raises and tends sheep
shingler – makes and works with slate and wooden shingles
siever – makes sieves, useful for agriculture and mining
silk-dresser – processes silk to make more marketable textiles
silk-maker – weaves silk
silk-maid – makes dresses out of silk
silversmith/brightsmith – crafts silver products (like jewelry, candleholders, inlays, fine plates and cutlery)
skald – recites (usually more narrative) poetry and epics (see minstrel), also may purport to see and interpret omens (see fortuneteller)
spectaclemaker – makes spectacles
spicer – merchant who deals in spices
spurrer – makes spurs
smelter – smelts ore into refined metals
stableboy - perform menial tasks (feed, groom, corral horses, clean dung, wash stalls) around stables
stablemaster – keeps care of the horses and stables
stonecutter/stonemason – a craftsman who carves out of stone, less regarded than other craftsmen, but still among the middle class
surveyor – surveys land, measuring and marking it for administrative purposes
swineherd – raises and tends swine
tailor – makes, mends and alters men’s fitted clothing
tanner – works hides and makes leather using urine, dung and offal (viscera and brains of cattle)
tasseler – makes tassels for clothing, hats and curtains
tenter – an unskilled, workman’s assistant
thatcher/thacker – builds thatch roofs
thresher – threshes grain (beats the crops to separate the grain from the chaff)
tile-burner – fires clay to make ceramic tiles for paving or art (like mosaics or encaustic tiling)
tinsmith – crafts tin products (like tableware and cutlery)
trapper – hunts game by setting traps/snares
treadmill worker – works on a large construction site, operating a hamsterwheel crane (often blind)
trencherman – a hanger-on who sponges off other people
unguentary – makes unguents and other salves
vaginarius – makes scabbards and sacks
water carrier – carries water from the well (often done by women and children)
wattler – makes wattle from weaving twigs and branches
weaponsmith – makes swords, axes and other war weapons
weaver/webber – weaves clothing and cloth
wetnurse – breastfeeds another woman’s child
wheeler – makes spinning jennies
wheelwright – makes and mends wheels
whitewasher – applies whitewash (a type of lime plaster) to building walls to give them a stark white appearance
winemaker – makes wine from grapes
wine merchant/vintner - merchant who deals in mead and wine, selling to taverns, commoners and lords
wineryworker – tends the vinyards and harvests grapes
wiredrawer – draws out soft metals (like gold and silver) into thin wires
woodcarver – carves wood to make art, tools and/or furniture
woodcutter/logger – cuts down trees and logs (see lumberjack, woodworker)
woodmonger – merchant for firewood and lumber
woodworker/lumberer/sawyer – cuts timber into lumber
yeoman – freeholder of a small acreage
 
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Endymion

Bookbinder
List of profession:

Accountant/accomptant – keeps track of monies for a businessman or business

Acreman/ackerman - raises and tends oxen

Actor - a person whose profession is acting on the stage.

alchemist – performs alchemy, a branch of chemistry focused on transmutation of metals

Ale conner – civil overseer for ale, beer and bread ensuring their quality and safe and acceptable sale

Apothecary – merchant and maker of medicines, herbs and salves

Architect – designs houses, cities and public works

Arkwright – makes cabinets and chests

Armourer - a maker, supplier, or repairer of weapons or armour

Atilliator/arbalester – crafts crossbows and arbalests

Baker - a person who makes bread and cakes, especially as a trade.

Banker (see deposit banker, merchant banker, moneylender, pawnbroker)

Barber - a person who could perform surgical procedures including bloodletting, cupping therapy, pulling teeth, and amputation. Barbers could also bathe, cut hair, shave or trim facial hair, and give enemas.

Bard - a poet, traditionally one reciting epics and associated with a particular oral tradition.

Barker – announcer for a performance

Basketmaker – makes baskets from stiff plant fibers, baleen or horsehair

Bather – owner of a bathhouse

Bearward – owns, trains and shows off a dancing bear

Beekeeper – raises and tends bees and collects honey and beeswax

Beer merchant – merchant for lagers (cheaper and lighter beers)

Beerbrewer - a person that manufactures beer.

Bellmaker – makes bells from iron, bronze or copper (see campaner)

Blacksmith – crafts and repairs iron and steel products

Bladesmith – makes iron and steel bladed weapons (see: scythesmith, knifemaker, swordsmith, coutelier)

Bleacher – makes paper from wood pulp via bleaching

Bleacher/whitster – bleaches clothes and textiles

Boatman/bargeman/canaller/ferryman/lighterman – people in charge of various ferry boats

Bog iron hunter – collects bog iron (small iron lodes found in bogs and swamps precipitated from iron-rich springwater)

Bonecarver – makes bone art or tools from animal bones, tusks, teeth and antlers

Bookbinder – puts together and mends books with leather or metal, sometimes decorates with gems, ivory or precious metals

Bookmerchant/stationer – merchant for books, scrolls and paper

Boothman – merchant for grain

Bowyer – a person who makes or sells archers' bows.

Brassware maker - a person who makes utensils or other objects made of brass (like candelabras, plates, mantles and hardware).

Brazier – crafts brass products (like candelabras, plates, mantles and hardware)

Brickworker – makes clay bricks

Bronzeworker/bronzefounder – crafts bronze products (like busts, statues, bronze armor)

Brothelkeeper – manages a brothel (pimp)

Brothelworker – a person that works in a brothel. Can be a prostitute.

Buckler maker (?) – makes bucklers- the small shield-like roundels used by fencers

Butcher - a person whose trade is cutting up and selling meat in a shop.

Calligrapher – writes manuscripts (see cleric, scribe)

Campaner – makes large (sept) bells (see bellmaker)

Carder – combs and refines wool or silk

Carpenter – constructs rough wooden products, repairs wooden objects and structures, or works on wooden projects.

Carpetmaker/tapestrymaker -sews carpets/tapestries (very large, ornamental carpets to be hung on walls)

Cartographer – a person who draws or produces maps from information learned from geographers and explorers

Cartwright – a person who makes and mends carts

Chandler - a person who makes and sells candles maked from tallow (beeffat/muttonfat) or beeswax

Chandler – - a dealer in household items such as oil, soap, paint, and groceries.

Charcoalburner – burns wood into charcoal in large, earthen kilns (often disdained and thought to be woodswitches)

Cheesemaker - a person who makes cheese.

Chimney sweep – cleans out the soot from chimneys

Cleric/illuminator/limner – septons who specialize in writing and illuminating (see calligrapher, scribe)

Climmer – hunts for eggs in cliffside nests

Clogmaker – a person who makes clogs, shoes with a thick wooden sole.

Cloth merchant – a person who trades cloth.

Clothmaker/clothier – makes and sells clothes

Cobbler/Cordwainer/Shoemaker - mends and repairs leather shoes

Collier – merchant for coal

Compasssmith – makes compass

Confectioner – makes candies

Cooper - a maker or repairer of casks and barrels.

Coppersmith/redsmith – crafts copper products

Cordwainer/shoemaker – makes leather shoes

Coucher/midwife (m/f)– attends and assists women during late pregnancy, labor and birth

Coutelier/Cutler – crafts small, domestic blades (knives, daggers, scissors and medical instruments), also often works ivory

Crofter – a farmer who tends a small farm (croft)

Cutler - a person who makes or sells cutlery.

Dairymaid – young women who milk cattle

Delver – ditch-digger

Deposit banker – manages and secures monies and makes and procures debts and loans

Diamantaire – diamond-cutter (medieval diamonds were usually left natural, but Westerosi might have figured out diamond-cutting)

Dock worker - a person whose job is putting goods on and taking goods off ships in a port.

Draper - a person who sells textile fabrics.

Dressmaker – makes and mends women’s fitted clothing

Drover – drives sheep and cattle to market

Drywaller/plasterer – builds walls made of drywall or plaster of Paris (obviously not a name used in Westeros), a material made from fired gypsum

Dung carter – collects animal dung and manure, bird excrement and human feces

Dyer – a person that makes dyes from a variety of sources and/or dyes cloth or other material.

Eggler – merchant for eggs

Executioner/justice – executes condemned prisoners

Farmer - a person who owns or manages a farm.

Farrier – applies horseshoes and trims/treats horse hooves

Fewterer – raises and tends greyhounds and other fast hunting dogs (see kenneler)

Fiddler/geiger – plays violins/fine stringed instruments

Fisher - a person who catches fish for a living.

Fishmonger – merchant for fish

Fletcher – crafts arrows

for payment.

Forester/wood – manages a forest for a lord/king by safeguarding it from bandits and poachers and by negotiating timbering and lumbering

fortuneteller/soothsayer/seer – claims to see the future and gives anecdotal advice to listeners

Fowler – hunts wildfowl (wild chickens, turkeys, geese, ducks, pheasants, pigeons, ptarmigans, quails, bobwhites, cranes, woodcocks, partridges, storks, pelicans, gulls, albatrosses and etcetera)

Fresco painter – paints artwork on wet lime plaster (different from PoP)\

Fruitier/costermonger – merchant for fresh fruit

Fueller – merchant for firewood, charcoal, peat or other fuels (see collier, woodmonger)

Fuller/tucker/walker – beats and cleans wool

Furrier – works hides and pelts to make fur products like rugs and clothes

Gardener – tends a garden (faut cultivar notre jardin, lol)

Glassblower/Gaffer – makes hollow glass products by glassblowing.

Glasspainter – stains glass and makes art out of it

Glover – makes gloves

Goatherd - raises and tends goats

Goldsmith/goldbeater – crafts gold products

Gong farmer - a person who dug out and removed human excrement from privies and cesspits.

Gravedigger – digs graves in cemeteries, a very poor and shunned job

Grazier/cattleman – raises and tends beef cattle/kine

Guard – a person who keeps watch, especially a soldier or other person assigned to protect a person or to control access to a place.

Guild master – manages a guild (essesentially the medieval version of a labor union, but exclusively for craftsmen, artisans and merchants)

Haberdasher – makes men’s hats

Harbour master - the official who is in charge of a harbour.

Harnessmaker/lorimer – makes harnesses and horse tack

Harper – makes harps

Harpist – plays harp

Hatmaker - (see haberdasher, milliner)

Hawker – hawks (quick-sells) goods door-to-door

Hawker/sperviter/falconer/austringer – breeds, trains and hunts with hawks/sparrow hawks/ falcons/eagles

Hay Merchant – merchant for hay and straw

Hayward – manages peasant farming and overseeing the day-to-day operations and activities of the farmers, livestock and storage facilities

Herald – an officer of arms for a lord to make proclamations, carry official messages, and oversee tournaments.

Herbalist – a person with the duty of planting medical plants, roots and herbs. Unlike normal farmers/gardeners, they studied the power of plants to heal and defend them from diseases and common cold. Back in the day many herbalists usually worked for the church, where they were given land to plant such crops.
 
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Endymion

Bookbinder
Herder - a person who looks after a herd of livestock or makes a living from keeping livestock, especially in open country.

Hetheleder – merchant for heather

Horse trainer – trains horses for riding and working

Hostler/ostler – grooms horses at an inn

Hunter – hunts game

Innkeeper – manages an inn where people can dine, drink and sleep

Ironmonger – merchant of smithy products

Jeweller – makes jewelry and works gemstones

Joiner – crafts wooden products without the use of nails and minimal glue

Kennel master – cares for a kennel of dogs

Knacker - collects dead and rotting animals and renders them into byproducts (like glue, bones, tallow)

Lampwright – makes lamps

Lancier – lance maker

Lapidary – engraves and polishes precious stones and gemstones (not including diamonds)

Latoner – (latten is a medieval catchall for copper alloys like brass and bronze) (see bronzeworker, brazier, bellmaker, campaner, mirrorer)

Launder – cleans and launders clothes

Leadworker – makes lead products (like architectural accoutremants (gutters, pipes, cistern linings (see plumber)), toys, weights and decorations)

Leech-collector – collects leeches from swamps for the purposes of leeching (non-scarring blood-letting)

Lensgrinder – grinds glass into optical lenses, seeing glasses and mirrors

Limeburner – burns calcium-rich materials (limestone, chalk, seashells) to produce quicklime

Linen Armorer – makes armor from linen and glue, or repairer o armour made from linen.

Linener/linen-draper – makes linen shirts

Locksmith – crafts and mends locks and other intricate iron machines

Lumberjack – fells trees (see woodcutter, woodworker)

Lutenist – plays the lute

Luthier – crafts stringed instruments, namely lutes

Mailer – enamels fancy plate armor (obviously very common in Westeros lol)

Malemaker – makes leather trunks

Marler – digs in bogs and along shorelines for marl, a lime-rich rock used as fertilizer

Marleywoman – sews marley, a fabric for embroidery

Mason/bricklayer – a person skilled in cutting, dressing, and laying clay bricks, stone or cinderblocks in buildings.

Master builder – lead mason on a project

Mercer - a dealer in textile fabrics, especially silks, velvets, and other fine materials.

Merchant – a person involved in wholesale trade or supplying goods to a particular trade.

Merchant banker – insures merchants and traders

Miller – operates a mill (usu. flourmill)

Milliner – makes women’s hats

Miner – works in a mine (there are many types of mines)

Minstrel/bard/troubadour – various types of singers who recite/sing poetry

Minter – runs a mint, makes coinage

Mirrorer – makes mirrors (by coating glass with lead (later a silver amalgam) or by beating a reflective metal (bronze, silver or tin)

Molecatcher - performs pest control by hunting down moles which ruin crops and gardens

Moneychanger – exchanges monies and valuables

Mummer – a pantomime actor

Nailmaker – makes nails

Nakerer – drums a naker (a small kettledrum)

Netmaker – weaves ropes into nets

Oil Merchant/oynter – merchant for oils, usually derived from animal fats or vegetable oils.

Oilmaker – processes animal fats (tallow and blubber) or vegetable oils into refined oils

Oyster raker – uses a rake to gather oysters in shallow water

Painter - An artist who paints a painting.

Papermaker – makes paper from pulping cotton or wood

Parchmenter – makes parchment from animal skins

Pasteler/pastrycook – bakes or makes pastries, such as pies (pieman/pie-seller), cakes, cookies, custards, pancakes, wafers (waferer) and doughnuts

Pastry cook - a professional cook who specializes in making pastry (pies, cakes, cookies, custards…).

Pawnbroker – loans out money with the insurance of pawned items

Perfumer – crafts scented perfumes

Perukier – makes wigs

Pewterer – crafts products from pewter (a tin-lead alloy)

Pinder - performs pest control by catching stray cats and dogs and impounding them

Pioneer/sapper/siege engineer – military specialist in siege warfare

Piper – plays pipes

Player/actor – performs in plays

Playwright – writes theatre plays

Plumber – works lead into pipes and pipefittings

Plumer – merchant of feathers

Poet – writes poetry

Poleturner – makes polearms

Porter – carries goods (usually specialized to a certain business operation)

Porter/gatekeeper/doorman – manages passage through a door or gate

Potter/Disher – makes clay pottery and dishes

Poulterer – merchant of live fowl (chickens, geese, ducks, pigeons and turkeys) and hares

Poulterer – merchant of live fowl (chickens, geese, ducks, pigeons and turkeys) and hares

Prostitute - a service worker who specializes in sexual and carnal pleasure

Purse maker – makes purses, used by women to carry money, prayer beads or writing pads

Pursuivant – a junior herald (see herald)

Quarryman – works in a stone quarry, breaking up and ferrying rocks

quilter – makes quilts (woven textiles sewn together into a patchy blanket)

Rag and bone man – collects refuse door-to-door

Ratcatcher – performs pest control by hunting down rats which carry disease and spoil stores

Rectifier – distills alcohol

Reedmaker – makes woodwind instruments (pipes, bagpipes, recorders, flageolets, sackbuts)

Restaurateur – operates a restaurant, a place that patrons can dine

Roofer - a person who constructs or repairs roofs.

Ropemaker – makes rope from hemp

Rugmaker – weaves or sews rugs

Saddler – a person who makes, repairs, or deals in saddlery.

Sailmaker – sews and mends boat sails

Sailor - a a person whose job it is to work as a member of the crew of a naval ship or boat, especially one who is below the rank of officer.

Saltboiler – boils seawater to obtain seasalt

Sartor – patches and mends clothes

Scribe – a person who copies out documents, especially one employed to do this before printing was invented.

Scribe/scrivener/amanuensis – a profession writer (this is duty is often fulfilled by maesters, when available) (see calligrapher, cleric)

Scullion/scullery maid (m/f) – performs the lowest tasks in the kitchens (such as scrubbing pots and plates(in the scullery))

Sculptor – makes statues and busts

Sculptor – makes statues and busts.

Scythesmith – makes reaping scythes

Seamster – sews clothing

Seaweed harvester – gathers seaweed for food and medicine

Septon/Septa – the religious leaders of the Faith

Sexton – secular caretaker of a church (this might not exist in Westeros due to the similar name)

Shepherd – raises and tends sheep

Shingler – makes and works with slate and wooden shingles

Ship chandler – a dealer in supplies and equipment for ships and boats.

Shipwright - a shipbuilder.

Siever – makes sieves, useful for agriculture and mining

Silk-dresser – processes silk to make more marketable textiles

Silk-maid – makes dresses out of silk

Silk-maker – weaves silk

Silversmith/Brightsmith – crafts silver products (like jewelry, candleholders, inlays, fine plates and cutlery)

Skald – recites (usually more narrative) poetry and epics (see minstrel), also may purport to see and interpret omens (see fortuneteller)

Smelter – smelts ore into refined metals

Spectaclemaker – makes spectacles

Spicer – merchant who deals in spices

Spinner - a person occupied with making thread by spinning.

Spurrer – makes spurs

Stableboy - perform menial tasks (feed, groom, corral horses, clean dung, wash stalls) around stables

Stableman - a person employed in a stable.

Stablemaster – a person who owns a stable and keeps care of the horses and stables

Stonecutter/stonemason – a craftsman who carves out of stone, less regarded than other craftsmen, but still among the middle class

Surveyor – surveys land, measuring and marking it for administrative purposes

Swineherd – raises and tends swine

Tailor – makes, mends and alters men’s fitted clothing

Tanner – works hides and makes leather using urine, dung and offal (viscera and brains of cattle)

Tasseler – makes tassels for clothing, hats and curtains

Tavernworker – a person who works in an inn or tavern.

Tax Collector - a person who collects unpaid taxes from other people or corporations in name of the lord or king.

Tenter – an unskilled, workman’s assistant

Thatcher/Thacker – builds thatch roofs

Thresher – threshes grain (beats the crops to separate the grain from the chaff)

Tile-burner – fires clay to make ceramic tiles for paving or art (like mosaics or encaustic tiling)

Tinsmith – crafts tin products (like tableware and cutlery)

Trapper – hunts game by setting traps/snares

Treadmill worker – works on a large construction site, operating a hamsterwheel crane (often blind)

Trencherman – a hanger-on who sponges off other people

Unguentary – makes unguents and other salves

Vaginarius - makes scabbards and sacks

Water carrier – carries water from the well (often done by women and children)

Wattler – makes wattle from weaving twigs and branches

Weaponsmith – makes swords, axes and other war weapons

Weaponsmith – makes swords, axes and other war weapons

Weaver/webber – weaves clothing and cloth

Wetnurse – breastfeeds another woman’s child

Wheeler – makes spinning jennies

Wheelwright – makes and mends wheels

Whitewasher – applies whitewash (a type of lime plaster) to building walls to give them a stark white appearance

Wine merchant/vintner - merchant who deals in mead and wine, selling to taverns, commoners and lords

Winemaker – makes wine from grapes

Wineryworker – tends the vinyards and harvests grapes

Wiredrawer – draws out soft metals (like gold and silver) into thin wires

Woodcarver – carves wood to make art, tools and/or furniture

Woodcutter/logger – cuts down trees and logs (see lumberjack, woodworker)

Woodmonger – merchant for firewood and lumber

Woodworker/lumberer/sawyer – cuts timber into lumber

Yeoman – freeholder of a small acreage